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On The Shoot # 3, Going The Extra Mile

Recently I was covering a golf outing for a client.  It was your normal kind of outing assignment.  Lots of group photos, candids, shots with branding and so on.  These can easily be the types of jobs that feel like if you have done it once you have done it a million times. This shot was taken in the ruff  just off to the side of the groomed surface.  Because of the white ball all of these images were taken 1 stop under exposed.

This shot was taken in the ruff just off to the side of the groomed surface. Because of the white ball all of these images were taken 1 stop under exposed.

You always need to be trying to come up with something different, to be able to produce something for your client that they may not have seen before.  Granted, this can be hard.  Many assignments are very repetitive.  Close-ups and macro can add something new or different to an assignment. During this shoot I spent several hours out by a tee taking group shots.  There were a few times when I had a five or ten minute break.  It was the perfect chance to do a little exploring and play with some ideas.  I grabbed a golf ball, tee and wristband and went.

With the wristband toward the center of the frame I need to leave space at the top and bottom for text to be added.  Additionally you could add a small portion of text to the right of the ball and wristband.

With the wristband toward the center of the frame I need to leave space at the top and bottom for text to be added. Additionally you could add a small portion of text to the right of the ball and wristband.

I settled on the view by the end of the tee position of that hole, after a few minutes of walking around looking for other options. During the morning I had been puzzling what type of shot could give the client something different to work with.  My goal for the shot was to give them an advertising piece for post cards, emails and the like as they promoted the event in the future. I did not have a macro lens with me, as this assignment required the ability to run and gun as much as possible.  The best option for some close-up work was a wide angle at minimum focusing distance.  To that end I always have my 16-35mm with me.  The minimum focusing distance is 11.2in. I set it there on manual focus and went to work.

By keeping the elements to the left the text would work well across the top and right of frame.

By keeping the elements to the left the text would work well across the top and right of frame.

With approaching these shots as a potential ad piece I wanted to get several different takes on the concept.  Anytime you are working with advertising photos you want to give your client different choices.  Additionally these different takes can give them the ability to use the images more than once. I worked with different combinations of the props and different locations.  All of the locations were within about ten feet of each other to make the best use of my time.  The ability to do multiple takes was one of the reasons I choose the spot.

One of my favorite aspects of this image is the sand traps in the background.  They bring out the feel of being on a golf course.

One of my favorite aspects of this image is the sand traps in the background. They bring out the feel of being on a golf course.

At the end of the day I do not know how or if the client will use any of these photos.  But that is not the point of why you do this.  This about going the extra mile, to give your client something they may have not seen before.  Additionally it is about opening them to the possibility of what can be done.  You never know, this could lead to new work.

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